"Enter Big G's Command Center Through the Revolving Doors on K Street"

27 Responses

  1. Clark says:

    Note that the website is brought to you by "Chimera Inc.", which has its own website, where the awesome continues:

    http://chimeraincorporated.com/

  2. Lizard says:

    This. Is. Awesome. Thank you for calling this out.

  3. tmitsss says:

    Now Veridian Dynamics has some real competition!

  4. Mike says:

    That is a work of genius. I'd like to buy the creators a beer.

  5. Dave Ruddell says:

    Now Veridian Dynamics has some real competition!

    Do they still have the octochicken? Weaponized pumpkins? Ploves? They'll be fine.

  6. ... says:

    Is that Ken's kid in the video?

  7. Luke G says:

    I would just like to register my extreme pleasure with the word "Tariffied."

  8. assemblerhead says:

    Good combination of humour and the truth.
    Nice find, Clark. ( or was it Ken? )

    Definitely sharing this with others.

  9. Oh, man, comedy gold. If they do manage to sell the figures for real, I'll definitely be getting one.

    Can't decide between Bankor and Stryker, though. Tough call.

  10. Library Nachos says:

    @Michael Donnelly:

    Why make a tough decision? Collect the whole set!

  11. Yeah, everything about this is excellent. It looks professionally-crafted, what with the attention to detail. Would love to know who put this together. For all that I harbor a deranging hate of the federal government, it's "silly" stuff like this, not complex arguments or anger, that changes minds.

  12. RKN says:

    The only thing I found weird was at the end where it was said Kronies are sold separately. How can this be? Kronies are Konnected. Monopoly power should be bundled and sold as one, no?

  13. Castaigne says:

    Amusing and it's been making the rounds on Free Republic, but I have to wonder if the people who make it are socialists. After all, in a true free market, everything and everyone is for sale – including the law. So-called "crony capitalism" is the result of people with money being able to buy politicians and regulations. Why would any true free marketer complain about that?

  14. Zack says:

    @Castaigne: Short answer is because in a truly free market you'd have the right to refuse the cost and benefits of laws.

    In current system laws give you the right to put a gun (literally and metaphorically) to somebody's head to compel them to do something.

    This means impartiality of the law ought to be sacrosanct in current mostly capitalist system but is not even considered the normal state of affairs at present. That is thrust of the complaint.

  15. I like how Big G's suit is 1/2 Red & 1/2 Blue, and his face is a mirror symbolizing how we have the power to control Big G, but when we let one person take control, they will succumb to the corruption of absolute power.

  16. Deathpony says:

    Id kind of like an Ariel Stryker doll for a mate who does work for Lockheed Martin here, but its probably subject to export control legislation and I'll end up being rendered to a secure facility in Pakistan.

  17. Castaigne says:

    @Zack:

    Short answer is because in a truly free market you'd have the right to refuse the cost and benefits of laws.

    That assumes you believe in that "Non-Aggression Principle" crap, which is errant nonsense. In a truly free market, force is available for sale and can be used in any situation it can be bought. See PDAs in anarchocapitalism for details.

    In current system laws give you the right to put a gun (literally and metaphorically) to somebody's head to compel them to do something.

    Yes, that ability has been purchased. without the ability to enforce and force, any law or contract is effectively null and void. The ability to compel compliance is what gives a law or contract meaning.

  18. Presumably, Castaigne, in our AnCap paradise we'll have the option of choosing which systems to opt into; perhaps my contract with the Popehat Fiefdom obliges me to put up with a heavily-armed Angus coming to my house to enforce the laws.

    But I'd still prefer that system to the current one, in which accountability is almost mythical, and the real levers of power are so far removed from the citizenry as to make a mockery of republican government.

    Besides, what does the rampant corruption of our political/lobbyist class have to do with the legitimacy of state force? Unless you're trying to make a moral case for graft?

  19. Shane says:

    Captian Korn when the sun is up, his mild mannered alter ego Orren Boyle for those late nights in the marble halls of DC.

    Heads they win tails you lose!

  20. Castaigne says:

    @Not Claude Akins:

    Presumably, Castaigne, in our AnCap paradise we'll have the option of choosing which systems to opt into; perhaps my contract with the Popehat Fiefdom obliges me to put up with a heavily-armed Angus coming to my house to enforce the laws.

    Indeed. And I make you an offer to a contract, you refuse it because it's sided in my favor, and my Carcosan Private Defense Agency invades, enslaves, and forces you to take the contract after your Angus is destroyed. Or you die. Whichever is preferable to you. Easy peasy!

    Also note that it would be absolutely valid for you to do the same to me.

    But I'd still prefer that system to the current one, in which accountability is almost mythical, and the real levers of power are so far removed from the citizenry as to make a mockery of republican government.

    1) I disagree that accountability is almost mythical, or Ken would never post articles and this would be All-Clark, All-The-Time. Ken posts about people being held accountable all the time. Unless, of course, you think he is lying.

    2) Define "real levers of power". According to the Constitution, I have these specified rights, as modified by interpretation in the courts and statutes, and the ability to vote for the representative whom I think should be making decisions for me. That's all we've ever had.

    Unless, of course, you mean something else, which in case I have no idea what that is. The only other meaning of "levers of power" I acknowledge is where I give orders and subordinates slavishly obey my dictates, like employees do for their boss. Is that what you refer to?

    Besides, what does the rampant corruption of our political/lobbyist class have to do with the legitimacy of state force? Unless you're trying to make a moral case for graft?

    1) I don't make moral cases for anything, since morality is completely subjective and individual to each person, and therefore meaningless outside the self. In short, what's moral for me will not be moral for anyone else in the world, and vice versa.

    2) Corruption has nothing to do with the legitimacy of state force. The two are entirely separate issues. And I don't see so-called "crony capitalism" as being corrupt, as to me it is a natural and logical progression of capitalist free market principles. Remember, there is no morality in the free market. There is only caveat emptor. And that which is not illegal is totally legit.

  21. Eric says:

    @Castaigne

    I wouldn't be surprised at all if it's getting play with socialists. I'd think if there's one things AnCaps and socialists can agree on, it's that government corruption is bad.

  22. Christoph says:

    Well, generally everyone agrees that government corruption is bad, and every involved party would say that everyone else is prone to corruption but they themselves are not. And most of this would be right, except for the very last part.

  23. Castaigne says:

    @Christoph:

    Well, generally everyone agrees that government corruption is bad, and every involved party would say that everyone else is prone to corruption but they themselves are not. And most of this would be right, except for the very last part.

    This is why I start with the assumption that everyone has a price. Including myself.

  24. Castaigne,

    Indeed. And I make you an offer to a contract, you refuse it because it's sided in my favor, and my Carcosan Private Defense Agency invades, enslaves, and forces you to take the contract after your Angus is destroyed. Or you die. Whichever is preferable to you. Easy peasy!

    We could just as easily apply this to our current situation, though. Why don't we invade Canada? Why doesn't New York annex Connecticut?

    Define "real levers of power".

    The ability to make and enforce laws which have a material impact on our lives, whether that's second order effects (screwing with the housing market) or direct actions, like the recent anal raping unpleasantness in New Mexico.

    I would submit that I have no real influence over what the policies of this country are. I would further submit that my elected representatives, to the extent that they are even responsive to me, have an inappropriate lack of influence over the policies of this country. In short, I think the "real levers of power" are the revolving doors on K street, and what Jonathan Turley calls the "fourth branch of government," the alphabet soup of regulatory and enforcement agencies like the IRS, EPA, ATF, etc.

    As for accountability, what else is police and prosecutorial immunity for? And to whom is Joe IRS Agent accountable? Government appointments are more or less for life, thanks to a variety of factors from government unions to sclerotic bureaucratic culture. Someone like Lois Lerner wielded very real power over a number of citizens, for years. And that power was, IMO, unchecked and unaccountable. That she was forced to retire only after 20+ years of acting out personal vendettas as an IRS employee is not, in my eyes, evidence that these people are being well-policed.

    Corruption has nothing to do with the legitimacy of state force. The two are entirely separate issues. And I don't see so-called "crony capitalism" as being corrupt, as to me it is a natural and logical progression of capitalist free market principles. Remember, there is no morality in the free market. There is only caveat emptor. And that which is not illegal is totally legit.

    But we don't have a capitalist free market. We have a mixed economy, in which certain economic actors collude with certain government actors for their mutual benefit. Kaptain Korn doesn't exist if we have a free market, but in the land of farm bills and green subsidies, he's a very real phenomenon.

    In a truly free market, force is available for sale and can be used in any situation it can be bought.

    You can do that today, but you have to buy it from a monopoly. Which is why it's mostly folks like Boeing and Goldman Sachs doing the purchasing.

  25. Devil's Advocate says:

    @Not Claude Akins

    Jonathan Turley calls the "fourth branch of government," the alphabet soup of regulatory and enforcement agencies like the IRS, EPA, ATF, etc.

    So if the executive branch is the fourth, what are the first three branches of government?

  26. Graham says:

    @RKN: Listen again. It says each figure is "bought and sold separately." More brilliance.

  27. Careless says:

    OT, but I got around to reading one of the books suggested in Clark's science fiction book thread, Grass.

    It is (spoilers), and I am not making this up, about mutant alien genocidal space ponies.

    And no, it was not better than Mote