Invocation of Doctrine of Canis Testis Rugos Creative, But Ultimately Unsuccessful

Law Practice

Nobody likes getting called for jury service. Not Mr. T, not me, nobody.

So it's natural to try to get out of it.

Here's a hint, though: when filling out an excuse affidavit justifying why you should not be called to service, resist the temptation to tell the judge that you would rather count the wrinkles on your dog's balls than spend time in his company. As the somewhat intemperate potential juror Erik Anthony Slye has now discovered, judges don't like that sort of thing. Judges spend a vast amount of time doing things that are much worse than examining dog balls, and even more time interacting with people less pleasant than a hound's taint. They get very few chances for amusement and personal gratification. Don't tempt them to send the marshals or sheriff's deputies out to get you.

Last 5 posts by Ken White

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. mojo  •  May 1, 2009 @8:03 am

    "Do not annoy Mr. Happy-Fun Court."

  2. JP  •  May 1, 2009 @9:32 am

    I think your post title is a little bit inaccurate. Sure, he had to apologize, but here's the last line of your Smoking Gun link:

    "And he also was excused from serving on a jury."

  3. Ken  •  May 1, 2009 @9:44 am

    Yeah, after he was summoned, threatened with jail, and made to apologize. And he wasn't excused based on saying he found it boring.

  4. JP  •  May 1, 2009 @12:36 pm

    Do we know why he was excused?

    My view is surely somewhat influenced by my own recent term of conscription into the service of my state's justice system, but a summons, threat of jail, and forced apology seems somewhat more pleasant than actually being on a jury.